Michael Eavis: Fleetwood Mac wanted too much money to play Glastonbury

27th Jun 16 | Entertainment News

Fleetwood Mac's pay demands were too much for Glastonbury founder Michael Eavis to bring them to the British music festival.

Fleetwood Mac Performing at Leeds First Direct Arena

The Go Your Own Way rockers were strongly rumoured to be performing at this year's (16) event, however they were not on the bill at Worthy Farm, England, over the weekend (24-26Jun16).

Instead Muse, Adele and Coldplay played the coveted headline slots on Glastonbury's iconic Pyramid Stage.

And Michael, who founded the festival in 1970 and still runs it with his daughter Emily, reveals that the reason he couldn't get Fleetwood Mac members Mick Fleetwood, Lindsey Buckingham, Stevie Nicks, and John and Christine McVie to play was because to sign up the whole band would've cost too much.

"Adele did it for less, Rolling Stones did it for a reasonable rate," he told Britain's Guardian newspaper. "We can't afford to spend 4-5m on people to play. Mick Fleetwood said he would do it himself, but come on. I'd like the rest of the band and they all want to be paid a lot of money."

Reports of a Fleetwood Mac appearance emerged after they played Britain's Isle of Wight festival last year (15).

Isle of Wight festival boss John Giddings revealed Michael asked him how he secured the legendary rockers' signatures after it was announced the Anglo-American group would be performing at his event,

John told Britain's MusicWeek magazine, "Michael Eavis said, 'How did you get Fleetwood Mac?' I said, I paid them!"

The band may be glad they gave Glastonbury a miss this year, as Michael admits that adverse weather conditions had made it the muddiest festival he could remember.

After braving the weather, at what he called the muddiest in 46 years, the Glastonbury organiser helped Coldplay close the festival on Sunday (26Jun16), as he joined the British rockers for a rendition of Frank Sinatra's classic track My Way.

© WENN Newsdesk 2016

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